John Francis Ford Anderson

From The Dreadnought Project
Jump to: navigation, search

Lieutenant-Commander John Francis Ford Anderson, (18 May,m 1882 – ) served in the Royal Navy. Upon first entering the Navy, his surname was wrongly recorded as Ford Anderson.

Life & Career

Born in Hampstead, the son of physician J. Ford Anderson.[1]

Anderson was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on 30 September, 1903. From 1903 to 1909 he served as navigating officer in a number of ships, including Pactolus, Adventure, Leander, Sirius, Pelorus, Highflyer and Arrogant.[2]

Anderson was a drinker. On 12 January 1906 he was tried in his first Court Martial for being drunk on board. The charges were proved, and he lost six months' seniority and was dismissed the ship.[3]

Captain Grant of Arrogant complained that Anderson was not a reliable officer and had to be continually watched. He further elaborated that Anderson might never be a good fit for service at sea, but could perhaps be valuable ashore in a surveying capacity. It was also noted that he drank to excess. The Board decided that Anderson was to revert to General Service.[4]

Having just received a fourth-class certificate as a surveyor, Anderson was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander on 30 September, 1911.[5]

On 25 April 1912 he was admitted to Haslar Hospital for liver disease. He was found fit on 22 July.[6]

His last appointment was to the battleship Jupiter as first officer, dated 11 March 1913. He was blamed for carelessness in the damage of eight cases of ammunition in 1913. In April and May 1914 he was being treated for alcoholism and it was decided that he would be subjected to quarterly reports. Despite this, he received the recommendation of Commander Nevile and was superseded on 5 June, 1914 but immediately thereafter fell into serious trouble.[7]

On 1 and 2 July 1914, following the funeral of a stoker, Anderson was Court Martialed on charges which included being drunk on board H.M.S. Challenger as well as conduct unbecoming an officer and contrary to the prejudice of good order and naval discipline in that he was seen drunk at the cemetary and acted in an irreverent manner. The charges were proved and he was dismissed the service.[8]

When war broke out, he appealed to have the sentence amended. This was refused, and he was informed he would not be appointed.[9]

From May 1915 to March 1919, he served in the Army and the Indian Army with satisfactory record.[10]

After the war, he obtained his Master Certificate.[11]

See Also

Bibliography

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
Reginald St. P. Parry
Captain of H.M.S. Astræa
3 Dec, 1912 – 11 Mar, 1913
Succeeded by
Alfred C. Sykes

Footnotes

  1. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  2. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  3. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  4. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  5. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  6. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  7. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  8. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  9. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  10. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.
  11. Anderson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/38. f. 242.