U.S.S. Celtic (1898)

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U.S.S. Celtic (1898)
Hull Number: AF-2
Builder: Workman Clark & Company[1]
Purchased: 14 May, 1898[2]
Laid down: 1890
Launched: 1 November, 1890[3]
Commissioned: 27 May, 1898[4]
Decommissioned: 23 June, 1922[5]
Sold: 17 January, 1923[6]
Fate: Mercantile
U.S.S. Celtic was a freighter purchased by the U.S. Navy and converted to a supply ship.

Construction

This article includes text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Celtic was launched by the Belfast shipbuilder Workman, Clark and Co. as the steamship Celtic King on 1 November, 1890 and completed in 1891.[7] On 14 May, 1898 she was purchased by the U.S. Navy and taken in hand at the New York Navy Yard for fitting out as a supply ship.[8]

Service

Celtic was commissioned on 27 May, 1898 with Lieutenant Commander Nathaniel J. K. Patch in command, and by June was in service supplying the American naval forces operating in and around Cuba with necessities such as medical supplies, fresh provisions, and ice. After the end of the Spanish-American War, Celtic was transferred to the Philippines to support the pacification campaign against the native population.[9]

Celtic was out of commission between 18 September, 1903 and 19 October, 1905, and again between 23 February, 1907 and 23 October, 1908.[10]

During the American landing at Vera Cruz in June 1914 and subsequent operations, Celtic served as the key supply ship, remaining anchored off the Mexican city for thirteen months from 16 June, 1914 to 24 July, 1915 apart from occasional voyages to Key West or Cap Haitien, Haiti for resupply and replenishment.

Decommissioned for the last time on 23 June, 1922 at Cavite, Celtic was sold into mercantile service on 25 July, 1922. Retaining her naval name, she continued operating until 1929, when she was broken up at Osaka.[11]

Captains

Dates of appointment are provided when known.

Armament

[25]

1898

  • three 6-pounders

1910

  • two 1-pounders

1918

  • four 3-inch/50 caliber

See Also

Footnotes

  1. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  2. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  3. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  4. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  5. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  6. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  7. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  8. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  9. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  10. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  11. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  12. List and Station, July 1898. p. 6.
  13. List and Station, July 1900. p. 9.
  14. Register of Officers, 1901. p. 14.
  15. Register of Officers, 1906. p. 18.
  16. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.
  17. Register of Officers, 1907. p. 18.
  18. Register of Officers, 1909. p. 12.
  19. Register of Officers, 1908. p. 14.
  20. Register of Officers, 1912. p. 32.
  21. Register of Officers, 1912. p. 32.
  22. Register of Officers, 1913. p. 18.
  23. Register of Officers, 1912. p. 32.
  24. Register of Officers, 1917. p. 20.
  25. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 133.

Bibliography

  • Silverstone, Paul H. (2006). The U.S. Navy Warship Series: The New Navy 1883-1922. New York: Routledge.


Supply Ship U.S.S. Celtic