John Morrison Smith

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Commander (retired) John Morrison Smith (14 June, 1882 – 19 September, 1947) was an officer in the Royal Navy.

Life & Career

Smith was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on the Supplementary List on 1 April, 1913.[1]

Smith was appointed to the new "P" Class patrol boat P23 on 7 June 1916, to assume command upon her completion. He was praised by the Admiralty for the manner with which he attacked an enemy submarine on 6 May, 1918.[2]

On 5 February 1918, Smith's Grasshopper was escorting a convoy when the Anchor Line/Cunard troopship SS Tuscania was torpedoed and sunk in the North Channel, off Islay by UB 77 as the convoy approached Liverpool. This would be the first troopship carrying American troops sunk in WWI and the only one sunk under protection of a British convoy. Grasshopper assisted in the rescue of American troops.[3]

Smith was appointed in command of the destroyer Mameluke on 10 August, 1918.[4]

Post-War

Smith was placed on the Retired List at his own request upon his relief, which occurred on 26 August, 1920.

Smith was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant-Commander on the Retired List on 1 April, 1921.[5]

At some point after October 1926, Smith married Jessie Campbell Wright. In Wrigley’s British Columbia Directory for 1927 and 1928, Smith’s occupation is listed as “fox farming” in Pavilion, Canada. He was managing Continental Blue Fox Farm in 1929 and by 1930, Smith had diversified to mink farming, while his wife worked as secretary in the Pavilion school and a justice of the peace. By 1932 Smith has also become justice of the peace and by 1934 a magistrate in Lillooet.[6]

World War II

On 31 May, 1940, Smith was sent to work with the Naval Officer in Charge, Vancouver, his appointment being with the Royal Canadian Navy. His appointment ended on 12 October, 1945.

Smith was promoted to the rank of Commander on the Retired List on 8 May, 1946.[7]

John Morrison Smith died September 19, 1947, in Vancouver, British Columbia, where he had lived for 11 years, and is buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Vancouver.[8]

See Also

Naval Appointments
Preceded by
New Command
Captain of H.M.S. P23
7 Jun, 1916[9] – 9 Jan, 1918
Succeeded by
Humphry C. Woolrych
Preceded by
Edward B. Hoyle
Captain of H.M.S. Grasshopper
9 Jan, 1918[10] – 10 Aug, 1918[11]
Succeeded by
Sir James H. Domville, Bart.
Preceded by
Basil W. L. Owen
Captain of H.M.S. Mameluke
10 Aug, 1918[12][13] – 30 May, 1919[14]
Succeeded by
Walter H. G. Fallowfield
Preceded by
Joseph H. L. Yorke
Captain of H.M.S. Plucky
30 Apr, 1919[15][16] – 9 Jan, 1920[17]
Succeeded by
?

Footnotes

  1. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  2. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  3. Email from Marilyn Gahm, Spooner, Wisconsin USA to Tone, Feb 5, 2016.
  4. The Navy List. (February, 1919). p. 841.
  5. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  6. Emailed article by/from Marilyn Gahm of Spooner, Wisconsin to Tone. 20170208.
  7. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  8. Emailed article by/from Marilyn Gahm of Spooner, Wisconsin to Tone. 20170208.
  9. The Navy List. (November, 1917). p. 396e.
  10. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  11. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  12. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  13. The Navy List. (February, 1919). p. 841.
  14. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  15. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.
  16. The Navy List. (June, 1919). p. 868.
  17. Smith Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/96/190. f. 236.