Difference between revisions of "Naval Secretary to the Board of Admiralty"

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By [[Order in Council of 19 March, 1872]], it was decreed that there were to be three secretaries to the [[Board of Admiralty]]; the [[Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Board of Admiralty|Parliamentary Secretary]], the [[Permanent Secretary to the Board of Admiralty|Permanent Secretary]], and a Naval Secretary.  Accordingly, Captain [[Robert Hall]] was appointed Naval Secretary to the Board on 8 May,<ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 38.</ref> for a term in office of ten years.<ref>"Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty."  Dated 27 November, 1879.  p. 4.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref>  Speaking in the House of Commons on 18 March, 1872, the [[First Lord of the Admiralty]], [[George Joachim Goschen, First Viscount Goschen|George J. Goschen]], expressed the belief that a Naval Secretary would relieve the strain on the Parliamentary and Permanent Secretaries.<ref>HC Deb 18 March 1872 vol 210 cc209-211.</ref>
 
By [[Order in Council of 19 March, 1872]], it was decreed that there were to be three secretaries to the [[Board of Admiralty]]; the [[Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Board of Admiralty|Parliamentary Secretary]], the [[Permanent Secretary to the Board of Admiralty|Permanent Secretary]], and a Naval Secretary.  Accordingly, Captain [[Robert Hall]] was appointed Naval Secretary to the Board on 8 May,<ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 38.</ref> for a term in office of ten years.<ref>"Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty."  Dated 27 November, 1879.  p. 4.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref>  Speaking in the House of Commons on 18 March, 1872, the [[First Lord of the Admiralty]], [[George Joachim Goschen, First Viscount Goschen|George J. Goschen]], expressed the belief that a Naval Secretary would relieve the strain on the Parliamentary and Permanent Secretaries.<ref>HC Deb 18 March 1872 vol 210 cc209-211.</ref>
  
The office of Permanent Secretary was abolished on 1 November, 1877, upon the retirement of the incumbent, [[Vernon Lushington]].<ref>Hamilton. ''The Making of the Modern Admiralty''. p. 204.</ref><ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 39.</ref>  A committee on the Secretary's department of 1879 recommended that a civilian Permanent Secretary be in charge of the department, but the Board "considered it desirable to retain their present Naval Secretary for the remainder of the term of his appointment."<ref>''Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty''.  p. 2.  Marginalia representing the Board's opinion by E. M. Swainson.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref>
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The office of Permanent Secretary was abolished on 1 November, 1877, upon the retirement of the incumbent, [[Vernon Lushington]].<ref>Hamilton. ''The Making of the Modern Admiralty''. p. 204.</ref><ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 39.</ref>  A committee on the Secretary's department of 1879 recommended that a civilian Permanent Secretary be in charge of the department, but the Board "considered it desirable to retain their present Naval Secretary for the remainder of the term of his appointment."<ref>''Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty''.  p. 2.  Marginalia representing the Board's opinion by E. N. Swainson.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref> Prior to the reorganisation prompted by the committee a clerk of the Military Branch had performed secretarial duties for the Naval Secretary where required.<ref>''Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty''.  p. 4. Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2.</ref> This was clearly rectified the following year, as by March L. Englefield had been appointed Private Secretary to Rear-Admiral Hall.<ref>''The Navy List, Corrected to the 20th March, 1880''. p. 297.</ref>
  
 
By [[Order in Council of 10 March, 1882]], it was announced that upon a vacancy occurring in the position of Naval Secretary that the only other secretary to the Board should be the Permanent Secretary.  At any rate Hall, with his naval career practically over, had been recognised as Permanent Secretary in all but name since 1880.<ref>See "Position and Powers of the Assistant Secretary," signed and dated by Hall on 2 March, 1880.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref>  On his retirement the office was abolished on 8 May.<ref>Hamilton.  p. 204.</ref><ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 40.</ref>
 
By [[Order in Council of 10 March, 1882]], it was announced that upon a vacancy occurring in the position of Naval Secretary that the only other secretary to the Board should be the Permanent Secretary.  At any rate Hall, with his naval career practically over, had been recognised as Permanent Secretary in all but name since 1880.<ref>See "Position and Powers of the Assistant Secretary," signed and dated by Hall on 2 March, 1880.  Greene Papers.  National Maritime Museum.  GEE/2.</ref>  On his retirement the office was abolished on 8 May.<ref>Hamilton.  p. 204.</ref><ref>''A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660''.  p. 40.</ref>

Latest revision as of 04:08, 4 July 2019

The Naval Secretary was a secretary to the Board of Admiralty from 1872 to 1882. From 1877 he headed the Naval, or Secretary's department at the Admiralty. The office was held by one officer, Vice-Admiral Robert Hall.

History

By Order in Council of 19 March, 1872, it was decreed that there were to be three secretaries to the Board of Admiralty; the Parliamentary Secretary, the Permanent Secretary, and a Naval Secretary. Accordingly, Captain Robert Hall was appointed Naval Secretary to the Board on 8 May,[1] for a term in office of ten years.[2] Speaking in the House of Commons on 18 March, 1872, the First Lord of the Admiralty, George J. Goschen, expressed the belief that a Naval Secretary would relieve the strain on the Parliamentary and Permanent Secretaries.[3]

The office of Permanent Secretary was abolished on 1 November, 1877, upon the retirement of the incumbent, Vernon Lushington.[4][5] A committee on the Secretary's department of 1879 recommended that a civilian Permanent Secretary be in charge of the department, but the Board "considered it desirable to retain their present Naval Secretary for the remainder of the term of his appointment."[6] Prior to the reorganisation prompted by the committee a clerk of the Military Branch had performed secretarial duties for the Naval Secretary where required.[7] This was clearly rectified the following year, as by March L. Englefield had been appointed Private Secretary to Rear-Admiral Hall.[8]

By Order in Council of 10 March, 1882, it was announced that upon a vacancy occurring in the position of Naval Secretary that the only other secretary to the Board should be the Permanent Secretary. At any rate Hall, with his naval career practically over, had been recognised as Permanent Secretary in all but name since 1880.[9] On his retirement the office was abolished on 8 May.[10][11]

Duties

Naval Secretaries

Footnotes

  1. A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660. p. 38.
  2. "Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty." Dated 27 November, 1879. p. 4. Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2.
  3. HC Deb 18 March 1872 vol 210 cc209-211.
  4. Hamilton. The Making of the Modern Admiralty. p. 204.
  5. A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660. p. 39.
  6. Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty. p. 2. Marginalia representing the Board's opinion by E. N. Swainson. Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2.
  7. Report on the Secretary's Department of the Admiralty. p. 4. Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2.
  8. The Navy List, Corrected to the 20th March, 1880. p. 297.
  9. See "Position and Powers of the Assistant Secretary," signed and dated by Hall on 2 March, 1880. Greene Papers. National Maritime Museum. GEE/2.
  10. Hamilton. p. 204.
  11. A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660. p. 40.
  12. Docket "Temporary Instructions for Naval Secretary."The National Archives. ADM 1/6235. Part II.
  13. "Distribution of Business" dated December, 1872. Milne Papers. National Maritime Museum. MLN/146/1.
  14. "Distribution of Business" in docket "Distribution of Business: Board of Admiralty" dated 24 April, 1882. The National Archives. ADM 1/6330.
  15. A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660. pp. 38-40.
  16. A List of the Lords High Admiral and Commissioners for executing that Office, which have been from time to time appointed, since the year 1660. pp. 38-40.

Bibliography

  • Hamilton, C. I. (2011). The Making of the Modern Admiralty: British Naval Policy-Making, 1805-1927. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521765183. (on Amazon.co.uk).

Board of Admiralty
Civilian Lords
First Lord of the Admiralty
Civil Lord of the Admiralty
Additional Civil Lord of the Admiralty (1882 – 1885, 1912 – 1917)
Controller (1917 – 1918)
Naval Lords
First Naval Lord (– 1904) • First Sea Lord (1904 – 1917) • First Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Staff (1917 –)
Second Naval Lord (– 1869, 1872 – 1904) • Second Sea Lord (1904 – 1917) • Second Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Personnel (1917 –)
Third Naval Lord (– 1869) • Third Lord and Controller (1869 – 1872) • Third Naval Lord and Controller of the Navy (1882 – 1904) • Third Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy (1904 – 1912) • Third Sea Lord (1912 – 1917) • Third Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Matériel (1917 – 1918) • Third Sea Lord and Controller of the Navy (1918 –)
Junior Naval Lord (– 1904) • Fourth Sea Lord (1907 – 1917) • Fourth Sea Lord and Chief of Supplies and Transport (1917 –)
Fifth Sea Lord (1917) • Fifth Sea Lord and Chief of Naval Air Service (1917 – 1918)
Staff Lords
Deputy First Sea Lord (1917 – 1919)
Deputy Chief of Naval Staff (1917 –)
Assistant Chief of Naval Staff (1917 –)
Secretaries
First Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (– 1869) • Parliamentary Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (1869 – 1904) • Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (1904 –)
Second Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (– 1869) • Permanent Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (1869 – 1877, 1880 –)
Naval Secretary to the Board of Admiralty (1872 – 1882)