Difference between revisions of "H.M.S. Thrasher (1895)"

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===Further Operations===
 
===Further Operations===
 
In early March, 1901, ''Thrasher'' returned to Plymouth escorted by the {{UK-Locust}} after three weeks cruising in the Channel, leaking badly, it was supposed, due to strain which occurred during a recent transit from Kingstown.{{NMI|Friday, Mar 01, 1901; pg. 11; Issue 36391}}
 
In early March, 1901, ''Thrasher'' returned to Plymouth escorted by the {{UK-Locust}} after three weeks cruising in the Channel, leaking badly, it was supposed, due to strain which occurred during a recent transit from Kingstown.{{NMI|Friday, Mar 01, 1901; pg. 11; Issue 36391}}
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''Thrasher'' arrived at Malta on 2 February 1904 in company with six other destroyers.{{NMI|Monday, April 4, 1904, Issue 37359, p.4}}
  
 
In mid-1913, she was serving with the {{UK-DF|7}} — a patrol flotilla.{{NLJul13|p. 386}}
 
In mid-1913, she was serving with the {{UK-DF|7}} — a patrol flotilla.{{NLJul13|p. 386}}

Latest revision as of 12:26, 8 November 2019

H.M.S. Thrasher (1895)
Pendant Number: D.79 (1914)
D.94 (Sep 1915)
D.90 (Jan 1918)[1]
Builder: Laird[2]
Ordered: 1894-95 Programme[3]
Laid down: 30 May, 1895[4]
Launched: 5 Nov, 1895[5]
Commissioned: Jun, 1897[6]
Broken up: 1919[7]

H.M.S. Thrasher was one of twenty-four "B" class destroyers built for the Royal Navy — a "30 knotter".

Service

Thrasher was named at launch on 5 November 1895 by Miss Eleanor B. Laird, daughter of the late Mr. Macgregor Laird, "the African explorer of the Niger and its tributaries".[8] She made a full-power coal consumption trial on the Clyde on 15 December 1896, obtaining a speed of 30.02 knots over three hours.[9] On 13 January 1897, she obtained 30.34 knots and completed her steering trials.[10]

Early in her career, Thasher was observed to require 8-10 knots speed to steer reliably and she made a knot per 12 revolutions.[11]

She arrived at Devonport on 9 April to be completed for sea.[12] She was specially commissioned at Deveonport on 15 June for service with the Mobilized Fleet.[13]

After participating as one of thirty T.B.Ds. in the Diamond Jubilee,[14] Thrasher was assigned to a division of destroyers to exercise off Plymouth for three days under the overall command of Captain H. B. Jackson.[15]

The destroyer paid off at Devonport on 12 July 1897.[16]

She was commissioned along with the Virago on 10 August 1897 for the Pacific Station, tender to the second class protected cruiser Phaeton.[17][18] They departed Plymouth on 19 August after Thrasher obtained 26 knots at her commissioning trials, one knot less than Virago.[19]

Collision, August 1897

Thrasher suffered the first of two accidents early in her service that same day as they set out for Vigo, when she collided with Phaeton in a cloudy night of heavy rain following a wrongly-copied course change signal. Both vessels were damaged and a First-Class Petty Officer named Cruikshank was drowned. Thrasher had her fore funnel, steel breakwater and gun mountings removed, and her crew transferred to the Sparrowhawk for passage to the Pacific, the latter destroyer having been diverted from previous plans to join the North American and West Indies Station.[20]

Thrasher's Lieutenant & Commander Oscar Valentin de Satgé and Gunner Frank C. Marston were Court Martialled on 27 August aboard the first class protected cruiser Blenheim. Thrasher had been six cables distant from her cruiser, on the starboard beam. A Morse flashed signal from Phaeton for a course change to south 58° west was copied in Thrasher as "south 38° west, which error produced a course on which the destroyer was converging on her leader by 20 degrees. The collision occurred either 15 or 25 minutes following the course change, and navigating Lieutenant Guy M. Marston in Phaeton heard Thrasher's syren a minute or two before the impact, though he could not see her hull.

The flashed signal proved difficult at both ends. Sidney Bastin, the signalman of the Phaeton, tried first to signal from the lower bridge, but he received the reply, "get further aft". Bastin, for some reason, did precisely the opposite – he moved to the forecastle. The signal made from there elicited the general answer from Alfred Dunstan, the signalman aboard Thrasher. It is worth noting that a Morse "5" (as in "south 58 west") is five long flashes, and a "3" (as in "south 38 west") three short flashes and two long. Durstin reported he'd had difficulty seeing the signal flashes due to glare from Phaeton's bow light and the rolling of his own destroyer, as a downward roll prevented him from seeing the remote light at all. Durstin admitted that in this case he only saw the first three flashes of the numeral, and that the unseen flashes left open the possibility that it was "3", "4" or "5". He apologized that he had not informed the officer of the watch of the dubious reception of the signal.

Lieutenant de Satgé testified that he had left the deck of Thrasher at 8.30 after over six hours on deck, leaving gunner Marston in charge of the ship. When a man came to his cabin to report the course change signal at 9pm, de Satgé started putting on his sea boots to go check that all was well when he heard the steam whistle blowing and the engines being reversed, as well as much shouting. He ran on deck and was halfway up the companion ladder when the collision occurred.

Lieutenant C. D. Graham, officer of the watch aboard Phaeton, reported he was making 9-10 knots at the time of the accident, and while he did not observe the destroyer approaching, he did hear its whistle and responded by stopping his engines and starboarding his helm.

Thrasher's Marston pointed out a ten minute discrepancy in signal time reports between the two ships, and the fact that Phaeton was not showing the customary position lights which would have made it easier to discern her course. No defence witnesses were called. The court acquitted de Satgé and Marston was severely reprimanded and dismissed the ship.[21]

Grounding, September 1897

On the morning of 29 September 1897, Thrasher ran aground along with Lynx off Cornwall. Thrasher's bows were shortened by about two feet (four tons weight) as part of the repairs, which was duly effected on 11 October, and she would have to be cut in two and a bend in the hull made good. It was intended that the lost length in the bow would be inserted before mending the halved hull.[22][23]

The grounding resulted in a Court Martial on the morning of 13 October, with Commander Robert Henry Travers charged with having negligently or by default stranded his ship. Thrasher had been leading the Lynx by a cable's length in a thick fog. Soundings were being taken at every quarter hour, but speed was never reduced to facilitate this operation; the last sounding was taken at twelve knots about two minuutes before the grounding and revealed sand and shell at 26 fathoms. When land was suddenly seen ahead, a signal was being hoisted to reduce speed to ten knots and Travers ordered his engines astern but could find no good place to run his ship aground, and he struck at seven or eight knots. The engine room responded with alacrity, despite having been provided no advance warning that they might have to suddenly reverse.[24][25][26]

Further Operations

In early March, 1901, Thrasher returned to Plymouth escorted by the Locust after three weeks cruising in the Channel, leaking badly, it was supposed, due to strain which occurred during a recent transit from Kingstown.[27]

Thrasher arrived at Malta on 2 February 1904 in company with six other destroyers.[28]

In mid-1913, she was serving with the Seventh Destroyer Flotilla — a patrol flotilla.[29]

On 8 February, 1917, she sank UC 39 after blowing her to the surface with a single well-placed depth charge.[30]

In September, 1917 when she transferred to the Nore Local Defence Flotilla,[31] serving there until at December, 1918.[32] From January, 1919, she remained at The Nore "temporarily".

Captains

Dates of appointment are provided when known.

See Also

Footnotes

  1. Dittmar; Colledge. British Warships 1914–1919. p. 57.
  2. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. p. 94.
  3. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. p. 94.
  4. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. p. 94.
  5. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Nov 06, 1895; pg. 4; Issue 34727.
  6. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. p. 94.
  7. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships 1860–1905. p. 94.
  8. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Nov 06, 1895; pg. 4; Issue 34727.
  9. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Dec 16, 1896; pg. 10; Issue 35075.
  10. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, Jan 14, 1897; pg. 10; Issue 35100.
  11. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, Oct 14, 1897; pg. 4; Issue 35334.
  12. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Saturday, Apr 10, 1897; pg. 15; Issue 35174.
  13. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, May 13, 1897; pg. 6; Issue 35202.
  14. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Monday, May 17, 1897; pg. 12; Issue 35205.
  15. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Tuesday, Jun 29, 1897; pg. 8; Issue 35242.
  16. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Tuesday, Jul 13, 1897; pg. 11; Issue 35254.
  17. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Aug 04, 1897; pg. 8; Issue 35273.
  18. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Saturday, Aug 07, 1897; pg. 6; Issue 35276.
  19. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, Aug 19, 1897; pg. 4; Issue 35286.
  20. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Monday, Aug 23, 1897; pg. 5; Issue 35289.
  21. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Saturday, Aug 28, 1897; pg. 9; Issue 35294.
  22. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Monday, Oct 11, 1897; pg. 7; Issue 35331.
  23. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Tuesday, Oct 12, 1897; pg. 6; Issue 35332.
  24. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, Oct 14, 1897; pg. 4; Issue 35334.
  25. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Friday, Oct 15, 1897; pg. 8; Issue 35335.
  26. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Saturday, Oct 16, 1897; pg. 10; Issue 35336.
  27. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Friday, Mar 01, 1901; pg. 11; Issue 36391.
  28. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Monday, April 4, 1904, Issue 37359, p.4.
  29. The Navy List. (July, 1913). p. 386.
  30. Smith. Hard Lying. p. 62. For some reason, I think the source calls this UC 9.
  31. Supplement to the Monthly Navy List. (September, 1917). pp. 16, 18.
  32. Supplement to the Monthly Navy List. (December, 1918). p. 16.
  33. "The Diamond Jubilee" The Times (London, England), Wednesday, Jun 16, 1897; pg. 8; Issue 35231.
  34. "Naval & Military Intelligence." The Times (London, England), Thursday, Aug 05, 1897; pg. 11; Issue 35274.
  35. Duff Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/42. f. 80.
  36. Duff Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/42. f. 80.
  37. The Navy List. (October, 1898). p. 303.
  38. Gilbert Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 19643/164. ff. 164, 248.
  39. The Navy List. (February, 1900). p. 306.
  40. Gilbert Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 19643/164. ff. 164, 248.
  41. Macrorie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/467. f. 521.
  42. The Navy List. (January, 1901). p. 307.
  43. Macrorie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43/467. f. 521.
  44. "Naval & Military intelligence" The Times (London). Friday, 6 December 1901. (36631), p. 6.
  45. Raikes Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/43. f. 490.
  46. The Navy List. (May, 1903). p. 308.
  47. Carter Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/301. f. 340.
  48. The Navy List. (October, 1904). p. 386.
  49. Carter Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/301. f. 340.
  50. The Navy List. (June, 1906). p. 386.
  51. The Navy List. (March, 1907). p. 386.
  52. Hewlett Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/46/123. f. ?.
  53. Hewlett Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/46/123. f. ?.
  54. Knowles Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/52. f. 257.
  55. The Navy List. (January, 1910). p. 386.
  56. Knowles Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/52. f. 257.
  57. Grubb Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/143. f. 348.
  58. Grubb Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/143. f. 348.
  59. Plowden Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/46/64. f. 64.
  60. Plowden Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/46/64. f. 64.
  61. Tweedie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44. f. 332.
  62. Tweedie Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44. f. 332.
  63. The Navy List. (April, 1911). p. 386.
  64. Hutchinson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/136. f. 341.
  65. Hutchinson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/47/136. f. 341.
  66. Hudson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/49. f. ?.
  67. The Navy List. (July, 1913). p. 386.
  68. Hudson Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/49/49. f. ?.
  69. Prichard Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/356. f. 401.
  70. The Navy List. (January, 1915). p. 385a.
  71. Prichard Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 196/44/356. f. 401.
  72. The Navy List. (December, 1916). p. 398q.
  73. The Navy List. (November, 1917). p. 398k.
  74. Kelly Service Record. The National Archives. ADM 240/56/142. f. 142.
  75. The Navy List. (February, 1919). p. 919.

Bibliography


"B" Class Destroyer
Quail Sparrowhawk Thrasher Virago Earnest
Griffon Locust Panther Seal Wolf
Express Orwell Lively Sprightly Success
Spiteful Peterel Myrmidon Syren Kangaroo
  Arab Cobra Albacore Bonetta  
<– "A" Class Destroyers (UK) "C" Class –>