U.S.S. Hector (1883)

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U.S.S. Hector (1883)
Builder: Wigram Richardson[1]
Launched: 6 Jun, 1883[2]
Captured: 23 Apr, 1898[3]
Commissioned: 22 Jun, 1898[4]
Decommissioned: 17 Sep, 1898[5]
Sold: 10 Oct, 1899[6]
U.S.S. Hector was a merchantman captured by the U.S. Navy in 1898 and converted into a collier.

Construction

Built by Wigham Richardson at Newcastle upon Tyne as the Lilburn Tower and launched on 6 June, 1883.[7] Renamed Pedro some time before 1898, she was captured by the New York on 22 April, 1898 off Havana. Over the next two months she was converted into a collier.[8]

Service

Hector was commissioned into the U.S. Navy as Hector at Key West on 22 June, 1898, with Lieutenant William L. Burdick in command.

From 10 to 20 July Hector made a patrol out of Key West up the Gulf of Mexico to Tampa before returning to Key West. She sailed for Boston on 24 July and arrived there a week later. Hector was decommissioned at Boston on 17 September 1898, and was sold thirteen months later on 10 October, 1899.

Hector returned to mercantile service in 1900 and was renamed D. N. Luckenbach in 1909. She was torpedoed and sunk by U 93 southwest of Brest on 27 October, 1917.[9]

Captains

Dates of appointment are provided when known.

Armament

[11]

  • two 6-pounders

See Also

Footnotes

  1. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  2. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  3. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  4. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  5. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  6. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  7. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  8. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  9. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.
  10. List and Station, July 1898. p. 7.
  11. Silverstone. The New Navy. p. 130.

Bibliography

  • Silverstone, Paul H. (2006). The U.S. Navy Warship Series: The New Navy 1883-1922. New York: Routledge.


Collier U.S.S. Hector
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